Gaelictronica DHÀ

17 June 2017, CCA

GAELICTRONICA DHÀ
17th June 2017, CCA5

Our second annual Gaelictronica event combined Gaelic vocal and instrumental music with cutting-edge electronica to create an exciting blend of traditional, ambient and dance sounds.

Alasdair and Ross Whyte share a common surname but come from very different musical backgrounds. Their work bridges the worlds of avant-garde composition and traditional Gaelic music. The duo made their Ceòl ‘s Craic debut in 2016 when we commissioned them to create experimental treatments of ancient Gaelic texts. Fast forward one year and Whyte have released their first album ‘Fairich’, represented Scotland in the Pan Celtic music festival and toured extensively. Especially for this performance they were augmented by Bùrach, the Morvern Gaelic choir whose combined voices shone in the atmospheric finale ‘Leis a’ bhàta’.

Ela Orleans has won international acclaim as a composer and performer. Her multi-layered sonic collages are hypnotic, ethereal and occasionally unsettling. Ceòl ’s Craic invited Ela to create a series of new works based on traditional Gaelic themes and to this end introduced her to Gaelic singer Ainslie Hamill. The pair performed their set as soundtrack to a mesmerising film created by Ela. Fragments of old black and white footage were superimposed and subtly manipulated to great effect. These elegiac images provided a perfect counterpoint to their haunting, poignant soundscapes.

Our final act of the evening was Inyal. Conal McDonagh (pipes & whistles), Owen Sinclair (drums), Robbie Greig (fiddle) and Hamish Macleod (keyboards & guitar) have joined forces to create a barnstorming live act which is taking the festival circuit by storm.
Robbie and Conal’s intricate musicianship was consistently to the fore, backed by Owen’s powerhouse drumming and Hamish’s frenetic electronic rhythms. The band performed in front of a stunning array of back-projected images which pulsated and transformed in time to the music. For this performance Inyal were joined by singer Josie Duncan whose voice soared above the energetic beats.

Gaelictronica Dhà underlined the fact that Gaelic culture is a living, ever-evolving force with relevance to an increasingly diverse audience.